‘House in Reference’ – PreJury I

In this semester, we have been working on a project which depends on researching and analyzing the houses, buildings, concepts and architects, because the main purpose of the project is building a house which is referred from other houses as you can understand the name of the project. In my previous posts, I explained my research about the case houses.

Research – Analysis

First referred house is Ö Evi by Erginoğlu-Çalışlar (Muğla, Turkey, 2006). Ö Evi has a single space sense. Actually, it looks like a three separate block from the outside, but inside there are three division parts which do not break the sense of the single space at the same time. Additionally, it has not got any partition walls; this also supports single space sense of the house. Space has been privatized with different furniture. It is an architectural interpretation that contains the sense of contemporary living and open space on the scale and on the underside, unfamiliar to the field without being overwhelmed by too much material. Designers say that “spaces are separated by elevation differences and moving elements, fluidity is impaired”. Also, openings are located through vista; this again supports single space idea. All spaces oriented through the same direction.

The second one is Maison Louis Carré by Alvar Aalto (France, 1959). Maison Louis Carré was designed by Alvar Aalto who use the warm and cold elements with together in his designs. The spatial organization was designed to bring private and public life in a case that divided these spaces with layers. One most move through multiple layers in order to reach the most private areas of the house. 

The third one is the Azuma House by Tadao Ando (Osaka, Japan, 1976). There is an axially symmetric composition. There are two cubical boxes are connected with one courtyard which is also transition space and circulation between the spaces in a way that horizontally and vertically. These two blocks are totally close, only the courtyard which is located the middle of the house open to the outside. So, it is only and natural light source of the house, in other words, the hearth of the house. In the courtyard part, there are 2 transitions one of them is from downstairs to the upstairs, another one is between the upper levels of the house. Additionally and importantly, visual continuity between the spaces is created by this connection/courtyard part.

House in Reference

Main referred qualities; Spatial continuity -single space sense- which also supported by the directing opening through the rich vista in Ö Evi. Visual continuity in Azuma House which is achieved by connection and transition part. Dividing spaces with layers as in the Maison Louis Carré. In a way to; Relation of two blocks in Azuma House is varied and multiplied in the design as a three-part which also referred Ö Evi. Due to this non-break block relationship, visual continuity between spaces is achieved. To differentiate spaces without using partition walls, elevation differences were used, for example, one of the three blocks shifted as Ö Evi by pilots. For single space sense, all openings of the spaces’ oriented through a certain direction, all of them look the same side.  This orientation is quoted from Ö Evi.  There is still transitional courtyard between the spaces, top of it again open to nature as in the Azuma House while it is closed to outside from exterior facades.  At the same time, this semi- invisible (this is my thought) courtyard, compare to the Azuma House’s, helps to divide spaces without any partition wall. In there, we can again mention the single space sense. Private spaces divided by layers, as Alvar Aalto did in Maison Louis Carré, by rotating upper levels in Azuma.  Also, these spaces’ scale supports this privacy.

Main referred qualities;

  • Spatial continuity -single space sense- which also supported by the directing opening through a rich vista in Ö Evi.
  • Visual continuity in Azuma House which is achieved by connection and transition part.
  • Dividing spaces with layers as in the Maison Louis Carré.

In a way to;

Relation of two blocks in Azuma House is varied and multiplied in my design as a three-part which also I referred Ö Evi. Due to this non-break block relationship, visual continuity between spaces is achieved. To differentiate spaces without using partition walls, elevation differences I used, for example, one of the three blocks shifted as Ö Evi by pilotis. For single space sense, I oriented all openings of the spaces’ through a certain direction, all of them look the same side.  I quoted this orientation is from Ö Evi. There is still transitional courtyard between the spaces, top of it again open to nature as in the Azuma House while it is closed to outside from exterior facades.  At the same time, this semi- invisible (this is my thought) courtyard, compare to the Azuma House’s, helps to divide spaces without any partition wall. In there, we can again mention the single space sense. Private spaces divided by layers, as Alvar Aalto did in Maison Louis Carré, by rotating upper levels in Azuma.  Also, these spaces’ scale supports this privacy. There is still transitional courtyard between the spaces, top of it again open to nature as in the Azuma House while it is closed to outside from exterior facades.  At the same time, this semi- invisible (this is my thought) courtyard, compare to the Azuma House’s, helps to divide spaces without any partition wall. In there, we can again mention the single space sense. Private spaces divided by layers, as Alvar Aalto did in Maison Louis Carré, by rotating upper levels in Azuma.  Also, these spaces’ scale supports this privacy.

The jury advised me that I did not have to take every reference at the same time and that I could get less than the other while I was taking a more arrow. So it was said that my head would be less involved. They also advise me that one of the houses I referenced has contributed to me and that I have to think once again about its relevance to other references.

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